Army veteran’s bone ‘paint’ would help treat combat wounds, promote regrowth

A paint-like substance intended to promote bone growth has inched a step closer toward human trials, potentially giving soldiers another option for treating combat injuries.

The substance, called AMP2, which is made by the company Theradaptive, was created by a retired Army lieutenant colonel who went back to graduate school after serving a year in Iraq in search of a way to help soldiers who were losing limbs because they couldn’t regrow tissue to restore function, according to Military.com.

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“To me, it felt like a tragedy that that would be the reason why you would lose a limb,” the veteran, Luis Alvarez, told the news outlet. “So when I got back from Iraq, I went back to grad school and the motivation there, in part, was to see if I could develop something or work on the problem of how do you induce the body to regenerate tissue in specific places and with a lot of control?”

Currently, some soldiers dealing with combat wounds are treated with a protein liquid to promote bone growth that can be difficult to control during application, potentially opening the door to further complications, according to Military.com.

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Alvarez’s product is a sticky alternative to that therapy, he said, and according to Theradaptive’s website, it would be used for spinal fusion, long bone repair, dental and facial bone repair and osteochondral repair.

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Theradaptive has received $9 million in grants from the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, Military.com reported.

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